Dix Six – Charged With Attempted Murder

Five of the Six have now had attempted murder and additional firearms charges levied against them… Can’t wait for the trial of these scumbags to commence…

CAMDEN, N.J. (AP) — The five men accused of plotting to sneak onto Fort Dix and kill soldiers there pleaded not guilty on Friday to the latest charges against them and received a new date for their trial.

Investigators say the men trained briefly in the Poconos, shooting at a rifle range near Tobyhanna Army Depot and renting a house at Big Bass Lake Estates.

U.S. District Judge Robert Kugler set jury selection for Sept. 29. Prosecutors said they expected the trial itself to take four to six weeks.

A lawyer for one of the suspects said he would be open to having the trial earlier if he and other defense lawyers could be ready earlier.
The men — all foreign-born Muslims in their 20s who had spent years in the Philadelphia suburbs — were arrested on May 7 and charged with conspiracy to kill military personnel in an alleged plot that was never carried out. Some of them also faced weapons charges.

This week, prosecutors added attempted murder charges against all five men and more weapons charges against four of them. All face life sentences if they are convicted of the conspiracy charge. Being convicted on all counts could add decades more.

In court Friday, the lawyers for all five entered not guilty pleas to all charges.

Preparing for the trial has been an arduous task because the government gathered a massive amount of evidence during a 15-month investigation.

On Friday, federal prosecutors said they would give defense lawyers recordings of 400 hours of some 12,000 telephone calls taken from the cell phone of suspect Eljvir Duka and two cell phones and a home phone of Mohamad Ibrahim Shnewer over a period of about nine months. That comes to about 10 calls per day on each of four phones.

Deputy U.S. Attorney William Fitzpatrick said most of the calls were not relevant to the case. “They didn’t talk to each other on the phone,” he said.

“We have people ordering pizzas and scheduling doctor’s appointments?” Kugler asked.

“Yes,” Fitzpatrick said.

Still, the defense lawyers say they and their clients need to plow through all the evidence — which now runs to well over 1,000 hours of recordings — to see if they can find anything that helps their case.
Also at the hearing, the defense lawyers said they would seek to have the trial held outside the Camden area because media coverage there has been extensive and could taint the jury pool.

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Dix Six Recruiting Terrorist In Jail

Well, the Dix Six, who recently tried to petition a judge that they should be moved into general polulation because they were not receiving fair access to the evidence in their case, seem to have other motives for wanting to be in the general population. As I pointed out in a previous post, location has nothing to do with access to evidence, that is their lawyers job to arrange for that. Also I said that they were in a secured area for their own safety. Well on top of that they are in a secure area for the safety of the general public. These scumbags are trying to recruit more terrorists while in jail, from the jails polulation. Not that this does not happen normally with Muslims in jail, but this is a group of terrorists who were in the processes of planning an attack.

Personally I think each one should be shipped to a maximum security detention center and each one should be completely isolated. These guys are a threat to our national security.

HADDONFIELD, New Jersey —  Federal authorities say one of the men accused of planning an attack on soldiers at the Fort Dix army base gave another inmate in a federal detention center an Al Qaeda recruitment video and another wrote a note referring to the fight “we weren’t able to finish.”

The U.S. Attorney’s Office made the allegations in a brief filed in U.S. District Court late Tuesday to oppose the suspects’ request to be granted bail.

A lawyer for one of the men said the government is misrepresenting an incident in the Federal Detention Center in Philadelphia.

The suspects contend that the detention center staff has not allowed them adequate access to evidence in the case against them as they prepare for trial. That is why they have asked a judge to either allow them to be free on bail or come up with alternate arrangements to allow them to review materials for the trial, which is scheduled to begin March 24.

The five men — all foreign-born Muslims in their 20s — were arrested in May and charged with conspiring to kill uniformed military personnel. Authorities said they planned to sneak onto Fort Dix, a base in New Jersey used primarily to train reservists for duty in Iraq and Afghanistan.

There was no attack, however.

A sixth man later pleaded guilty to providing weapons to some of the five charged in the alleged conspiracy.

In the legal filing, the government said Mohamad Ibrahim Shnewer gave another inmate a copy of an Al Qaeda-produced DVD last month. Guards found the disc in a book in the detention center’s law library.

Government lawyers said in the filing that “the fact the defendant Shnewer and, perhaps, his co-conspirators may be spreading jihadist recruitment videos to other inmates clearly raises grave security concerns for the warden, and, again, supports the reasonableness of continued administrative detention for these defendants.”

Shnewer’s lawyer, Rocco Cipparone, said Shnewer told him 10 days or so ago about the incident. But Cipparone said Shnewer did not give the other inmate the video. Rather, he said, Shnewer was upset that the man somehow got hold of evidence that only the defendants in the case were supposed to see.

The government also said that suspect Eljvir Duka and another inmate were passing notes.

In one note, the government said, Duka wrote, “Now you see why we were going to sacrifice all for the sake of Allah in jihad” and referred to the fight “we weren’t able to finish.”

The government said detention center staff confronted Duka about the notes. According to the filing, he acknowledged he was passing them but said they only dealt with “issues such as the quality of the food” behind bars.

Duka’s lawyer, Troy Archie, did not immediately return a voice mail or e-mail message Tuesday night.

The government also said the five men have had access to the evidence when they requested it.

The five suspects include three ethnic Albanians from the former Yugoslavia, a Jordanian and a Turk.

A hearing on the men’s bail motion is scheduled for Dec. 20.

Dix Six – How Can You Treat Your Terrorist Like This

Three of the Dix Six Terrorists, who planned to attack soldiers at Fort Dix, in NJ and trained in the Pocono’s of Pennsylvania are whining about how they are being unfairly treated while in prison. Well sorry boys, but your special housing is probably for your own good, I for one would like to see you put in General Population. As for not being allow the number of phone calls you feel you deserve and having the number of visitors you would like, well tough. You are in jail for planning terrorist attacks, if it were up to me you would only have access to your lawyers. There would be no phone calls and no visitors as both are a security risk. As for being in special housing, that has nothing to do with your access to review evidence, that is your lawyers job to get you the information to review. Speaking of your lawyer, I like how the one complains how he has never experienced having to speak English with other clients. I wonder how many of his clients were terrorists planning on killing Americans…

MOUNT LAUREL, N.J. (AP) — Three of the five men charged with plotting an attack on Fort Dix have asked a judge to move them from a secluded part of a prison as they await trial.

In legal filings over the past week, the men repeat a complaint that their lawyers have made before: In the Special Housing Unit of the Federal Detention Center in Philadelphia, they are not being given adequate access to the government’s evidence in their case.

A judge may consider the new requests from Dritan Duka, Mohamad Ibrahim Shnewer and Serdar Tatar at a status conference scheduled for Tuesday. As of Monday, the other two men — Eljvir and Shain Duka — had not made similar requests. But they and their lawyers have complained about their treatment in custody.
The Special Housing Unit is used to house suspects whom authorities believe should not be in the general population — often for their own protection. Inmates there are rarely let out of their cells. But it is not solitary confinement; some have cellmates. All five men have been in the unit since they were arrested.

The men, all foreign-born and in their 20s, were charged in May with planning a raid on Fort Dix. They face life in prison if they’re convicted of conspiring to murder military personnel. A sixth man pleaded guilty last month to conspiring to provide weapons to the group.
Authorities have said the men scouted out East Coast military installations to find one to attack but settled on the Fort Dix base largely because one of them knew his way around from delivering pizzas to the base for his father’s restaurant. The installation, which is being used largely to train reservists bound for Iraq, was not attacked.

Investigators say the men trained in the Poconos, using a rifle range near Tobyhanna and staying briefly in a rented house at Big Bass Lake Estates.

Their lawyers argue that the men are not supposed to be placed in the high security unit for punitive reasons — so they should be placed in the general population of the detention center.
Their lawyers also argue that they want the men to hear — and in some cases, see — about 200 hours of audio and video recordings the government made while investigating the case.

But the men are getting access to the recordings only sporadically, their lawyers have said.

The men have also complained that they are not being allowed visits from their families and phone calls as often as they should.
Rocco Cipparone, the lawyer for Shnewer, said he believes low-level detention center employees have been the ones restricting the movements of the suspects.

He said that when he visits Shnewer, he must sign a form pledging to communicate with him only in English.

“I’ve never ever seen it for other clients” in custody, Cipparone said.